Ink Review: Noodler's Air Corps Blue-Black

This ink was a surprise.  I've not been a huge fan of Noodler's ink.  I've found that with certain exceptions, Noodler's never dries, transfers ("ghosts") onto previous pages when you try to write on both sides of a notebook page, and stains pens.  Reading some of the pen forums, people have resorted to diluting the ink with distilled water in order to eliminate some of these undesirable characteristics, but that's always seemed like too much trouble for me.  I'm all for fiddling around with this hobby, but as far as ink goes, I've always expected it to "write right out of the bottle." I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this ink was, to me, one of the Noodler's exceptions. 

I compared this to three other inks I had loaded up:  Montblanc's Irish Green, Sailor's Epinard, and Noodler's Ellis Island Blue-Black, all of which I like, and the latter of which I really want to love, if not for the fact that it seemingly never dries (in a fine nib, no less).  Grrrr...

I compared this to three other inks I had loaded up:  Montblanc's Irish Green, Sailor's Epinard, and Noodler's Ellis Island Blue-Black, all of which I like, and the latter of which I really want to love, if not for the fact that it seemingly never dries (in a fine nib, no less).  Grrrr...

The pen I used for this review as a Nakaya Portable Writer (with clip) in Solid Black.  The nib's a medium, which translates into a Western fine, maybe an extra-fine depending on the brand.  This ink worked well in the pen.  No hard starts, and no staining the converter.  The paper is an Exacompta index card.  

I will say that this ink is more of a dark teal as opposed to a true blue-black, leaning heavily towards the blue-green end of the spectrum.  If I had to compare it to anything, I might choose Pharmacist's Turkish Night.  (I know, I know, I never finished the Pharmacist series of reviews that I started a year or so ago.  Those are in the queue.)